Description

Outstretched hands receive the host during Mass. Communion may be received either in the hand or on the tongue. Around the year A.D. 390, Cyril of Jerusalem indicated that the early Church practiced Communion in the hand when he instructed his audience: “Approaching, therefore, come not with thy wrists extended, or thy fingers open; but make thy left hand as if a throne for thy right, which is on the eve of receiving the King.” (Catechetical Lectures 23:22).

The Congregation of the Sacraments and Divine Worship permitted the U.S. Bishops’ Conference to authorize reception of the Blessed Sacrament in the hand on July 25, 1977, provided the local bishop implements the practice in his diocese. Once implemented, the option to receive the Eucharist either in the hand or on the tongue always remains with the communicant. No priest, deacon, acolyte, or extraordinary minister of Holy communion may refuse a communicant communion on the tongue. Likewise, once the local bishop has introduced communion in the hand, none may refuse a communicant communion in the hand (except when communion is being given by intinction, in which case it must be given on the tongue)

  • Screen res for blogs, email & social

  • Hi-res for books & magazines

  • Full page hi-res for printed materials

  • Ultra hi-res for posters & large output